About My

Style

My style of wedding photography is a mix of ‘story-telling’ and ‘informal portrait’.

Whilst a documentary photographer will capture events as they unfold, I act more as the narrator in your story. I set the context, link the various scenes together and make clear those finer points which are not obvious on their own.

Every story has a beginning, a middle and an end. I miror this in your album, setting the context of your album with the beginning, breaking the main story into a number of definable ‘chapters’ and then ending on a high.

As with any good story-teller, I embellish where necessary to portray your story in the best possible way, tidying up background details, moving furniture and adding light.

Part of that story-telling is in the medium through which it is told. I use a type of album most suited to story-telling allowing multiple images to be shown on a double page spread. These are produced from my suppler in Italy, they take about 6 weeks, but the results are worth it! You can also purchase just the images if you wish to produce your own album.

Informal Story Telling

Most of the images I take are candid, recording events as they unfold, allowing you to get on and enjoy your big day. I edit 'in-camera, choosing my angles, crops and depths of field carefully to focus on the key elements.

80%
Arranged Portrait

Certain things just won't happen on their own, the groups and couple portraits for instance. I'll set these up in an informal way to make sure they happen. I work from a list of key photographs you definitely want and we arrange that before your wedding.

20%
Relaxed

Even with staged photographs, I tend to keep things quite Relaxed. Tidy and neat, yes. But still very much a relaxed affair. I believe if you feel relaxed and like you are having fun you will look that way. My whole ethos is based on that!

100%
Interactive

I interact with you and your guests and try to capture the day from the perspective of an insider to your day, rather than a bystander looking in. I specifically use a fixed 35mm prime lens to reinforce that first person perspective.

100%

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